The Puppet Master Index 1946 – 2017

Introduction

The Puppet Master has been produced continuously by the Guild since 1946, sometimes monthly, bimonthly, haphazardly and then annually. Before World War II the Guild published Notes and News and then during the war The Wartime Bulletin.

Most people will not be aware of the amount of work undertaken by the succession of editors over the years, especially in the pre-digital age even so, the standard enjoyed for the last 25 years using computers, scanners etc is still no mean feat. We owe them all a great debt for providing a record of Guild members work and also of other puppetry activities in Britain, together with news, views and technical articles some of which the editors had to write themselves when efforts to cajole others to contribute had not been sufficiently fruitful.

Much of the material could be seen as ephemeral but it is an important record which will exist long after Kindles have become obsolete and will form a part of our National Puppetry Archive. It is this lasting record which is so valuable for archivists and researchers.

There have been numerous occasions over the last few years when we have been asked for information relating to a long-deceased puppeteer by someone researching family history, or by a puppeteer looking to solve a technical problem when leads and answers have been found somewhere in the Puppet Master pages.

So we also appreciate the many contributors for sharing information and know how. This index of 144 issues to date should help you to find that, often elusive information, somewhere.

It has been compiled over a period of several months and you will doubtless find imperfections, inconsistencies and idiosyncrasies in the choice of entries. It does however take into account the occasional errors in the consecutive numbering of issues by using the identifiers supplied by the late Guild Archivist, Tom Howard. Ambiguities in the numbering are identified in the authenticated list of issues below by a description of the front covers.

I realise that only a few people will find the need for this index, but my hope is that future archivists and researchers will find it a useful aid to their work.

If you see any errors or omissions, please email: ray-dasilva@uwclub.net